Let's start with Prince Philip of England, it seems he has to say a lot about this subject:

"In the event that I am reincarnated, I would like to return as a deadly virus, in order to contribute something to solve overpopulation."

"I don't claim to have any special interest in natural history, but as a boy I was made aware of the annual fluctuations in the number of game animals and the need to adjust the "cull'' to the size of the surplus population."

"For example, the World Health Organization Project, designed to eradicate malaria from Sri Lanka in the postwar years, achieved its purpose. But the problem today is that Sri Lanka must feed three times as many mouths, find three times as many jobs, provide three times the housing, energy, schools, hospitals and land for settlement in order to maintain the same standards. Little wonder the natural environment and wildlife in Sri Lanka has suffered. The fact [is] ... that the best-intentioned aid programs are at least partially responsible for the problems."

"What has been described as the "balance of nature'' is simply nature's system of self-limitation. Fertility and breeding success create the surpluses after allowing for the replacement of the losses. Predation, climatic variation, disease, starvation--and in the case of the inappropriately named Homo sapiens, wars and terrorism--are the principal means by which population numbers are kept under some sort of control."

"I suspect that the single most important gift of progress to conservation has been the development of human contraception techniques."

"So long as they [birth control methods] ... remained taboo subjects the chances of making any impression on the human population explosion were that much more remote."

Maurice Strong, Secretary-General of the UN Earth Summit, June 1992:

“Isn't the only hope for the planet that the industrialised civilisations collapse? Isn't it our responsibility to bring that about?”

Lord Bertrand Russell, The Impact of Science on Society, 1953:

“At present the population of the world is increasing at about 58,000 per diem. War, so far, has had no very great effect on this increase, which continued throughout each of the world wars…. War … has hitherto been disappointing in this respect … but perhaps bacteriological war may prove more effective. If a Black Death could spread throughout the world once in every generation, survivors could procreate freely without making the world too full…. The state of affairs might be somewhat unpleasant, but what of it? Really high-minded people are indifferent to happiness, especially other peoples'….”

Dr John Reid speaking with Robyn Williams on ABC radio, 10 December, 2006:

"One human way to reduce the population might be to put something in the water, a virus that would be specific to the human reproductive system and would make a substantial proportion of the population infertile. Perhaps a virus that would knock out the genes that produce certain hormones necessary for conception. ... A triage approach will be necessary so that scarce medical resources go to those who can contribute most to the long-term viability of the planet. Consequently, many middle-aged-to-elderly people will die uncomfortable deaths. Not every problem is solvable."

Jacques Cousteau(Co-recipient in 1977 of the International Environmental Prize awarded by the United Nations for outstanding contributions in the field of the environment),quoted from UNESCO Courier, November 1991:

“This is a terrible thing to say. In order to stabilize world populations, we must eliminate 350,000 people per day. It is a horrible thing to say, but it's just as bad not to say it.”

David Brower, first executive director of the Sierra Club; founder of Friends of the Earth; and founder of the Earth Island Institute:

“Childbearing should be a punishable crime against society, unless the parents hold a government license. …All potential parents should be required to use contraceptive chemicals, the government issuing antidotes to citizens chosen for childbearing.”

John Davis, editor of, Earth First! Journal:

“I suspect that eradicating small pox was wrong. It played an important part in balancing ecosystems.”

Dr Lyall Watson, anthropologist, Commissioner for the International Whaling Commission, as quoted in the Financial Times, 15 July 1995:

"[Cannibalism is a] “radical but realistic solution to the problem of overpopulation."

Dr Lamont Cole, Professor of Ecology, Cornell University, as quoted by Elizabeth Whelan in her book, Toxic Terror:

“To feed a starving child is to exacerbate the world population problem.”

Merton Lambert, former spokesman for the Rockefeller Foundation, quoted from Harpeth Journal, Dec. 18, 1962:

“The world has cancer, and that cancer is man.”

Quotes are taken from:

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